AFT - American Federation of Teachers

Shortcut Navigation:
 
Email ShareThis

Labor History Timeline


The fight for economic and social justice

1946   Largest strike wave in U.S. history
1947   Taft-Hartley Act restricts union members' activities
1949   First two of 11 unions with Communist leaders are purged from CIO
1952   George Meany and Walter Reuther become presidents of AFL and CIO, respectively;
    In Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company v. Sawyer , the U.S. Supreme Court ruled President Truman’s seizure of steel mills to prevent a strike during a time of war to be unconstitutional.
1955   AFL and CIO merge; George Meany becomes president
1959   Labor Management Reporting and Disclosure Act (Landrum-Griffin) passed
1962 President John Kennedy's order gives federal workers the right to bargain
National Farm Workers Association Created
1963 March on Washington for jobs and Justice Equal Pay Act bans wage discrimination based on gender
1964   Civil Rights Act bans institutional forms of racial discrimination
1965   AFL-CIO forms A. Philip Randolph Institute
  César Chávez and Dolores Huerta form the AFL-CIO United Farm Workers and start the grape boycott 
1968 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. assassinated in Memphis, Tenn., during sanitation workers' strike  

Progress and new challenges

1970   Occupational Safety and Health Act passed
1972   Coalition of Black Trade Unionists formed
1973   Labor Council for Latin American Advancement founded
1974   Coalition of Labor Union Women founded
1981   President Reagan breaks air traffic controllers’s strike AFL-CIO rallies 400,000 in Washington on Solidarity Day
1989   Organizing Institute created
1990   United Mine Workers of America win strike against Pittston
    Coal United Steelworkers of America labor Alliance created within the AFL-CIO
1992   Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance created within AFL-CIO
1997   AFL-CIO defeats legislation giving the president the ability to “Fast Track" trade legislation without assured protection of workers’ rights and the environment

 

« Previous